What is a consonant digraph in phonics?

Consonant digraphs are two (or three) letters that come together to make one sound. The difference between blends and digraphs is that blends are two letters that make two sounds and digraphs make one sound.Click to see full answer. Similarly one may ask, what is a consonant digraph example?Consonant blends (also called consonant clusters) are groups of two or three consonants in words that makes a distinct consonant sound, such as “bl” or “spl.” Consonant digraphs include: bl, br, ch, ck, cl, cr, dr, fl, fr, gh, gl, gr, ng, ph, pl, pr, qu, sc, sh, sk, sl, sm, sn, sp, st, sw, th, tr, tw, wh, wr.Likewise, what are the 7 Digraphs? Common consonant digraphs include ch (church), ch (school), ng (king), ph (phone), sh (shoe), th (then), th (think), and wh (wheel). Additionally, what is a digraph in phonics? A digraph is two letters that spell one sound. Digraphs that spell consonant sounds include the letter pairs sh, ch, th, wh, ck, ph, ng. Digraphs that spell vowel sounds include the letter pairs ai, ay, ee, ea, ie, ei, oo, ou.What is the difference between a digraph and a blend?Digraphs are two letters that make just one sound. CH in the word “chair” and PH in the word “phone” are both examples of digraphs. Blends, on the other hand, are two or more consonants that BLEND together but each sound can still be heard. For instance, the words “skirt” and “clock” start with the blends SK and CL.

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