Why do we use non coding regions of DNA for fingerprinting?

In the non-coding regions of the genome, sequences of DNA are frequently repeated giving rise to so-called VNTRs – variable number tandem repeats. In terms of where we came from, DNA fingerprinting is commonly used to probe our heredity.Click to see full answer. In this regard, why is non coding DNA used in genetic fingerprinting?In the non-coding regions of the genome, sequences of DNA are frequently repeated giving rise to so-called VNTRs – variable number tandem repeats. In terms of where we came from, DNA fingerprinting is commonly used to probe our heredity.Furthermore, why are non coding regions important? Some examples include transfer RNA, ribosomal RNA, and translation-controlling RNA. Another function of non-coding DNA is to regulate gene transcription. These sections of DNA provide binding sites for proteins that can affect transcription. An important regulatory site common to all genes is a promoter region. Then, what are non coding regions of DNA used for? In genetics, the term junk DNA refers to regions of DNA that are non-coding. Some of this noncoding DNA is used to produce noncoding RNA components such as transfer RNA, regulatory RNA and ribosomal RNA.What evidence at a crime scene can be used for DNA fingerprinting?All biological evidence found at crime scenes can be subjected to DNA testing. Samples such as feces and vomit can be tested, but may not be routinely accepted by laboratories for testing.

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